The Long Mars - Stephen Baxter & Terry Pratchett

The Long Mars

By Stephen Baxter & Terry Pratchett

  • Release Date: 2014-06-19
  • Genre: Sci-Fi & Fantasy
Score: 4
4
From 81 Ratings

Description

'Imaginative, sense-of-wonder at its best . . . thrilling stuff from the masters' Independent on Sunday

2040-2045: In the years after a cataclysmic eruption there is massive economic dislocation as populations flee to myriad Long Earth worlds.

Sally, Joshua, and Lobsang are all involved in this perilous work when, out of the blue, Sally is contacted by her long-vanished father and inventor of the original Stepper device, Willis Linsay. He tells her he is planning a fantastic voyage across the Long Mars and wants her to accompany him. But he is not what he seems.

For Joshua, the crisis he faces is much closer to home. He becomes embroiled in the plight of the Next: the super-bright post-humans who are beginning to emerge from their 'long childhood' in a hidden community located deep in the Long Earth. Ignorance and fear are causing 'normal' human society to turn against the Next - and a dramatic showdown seems inevitable . . .
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The Long Mars is the third in The Long Earth series.

Reviews

  • Again an excellent story with poor writing

    3
    By auraboy
    Much like the previous episode, this contains several books worth of great ideas and massively original and genuinely philosophical sci-fi. There are some much needed action and adventure sequences this time and the whole arc is a lot more coherent than the previous episode but it suffers from the same poor writing. I can only assume Terry Pratchett has either lost his gift for dialogue and plotting without heavy handed 'this is the plot and this is why these characters are good' - or this is Baxters work and he's not that good at it. There is some terrible writing, awful characterisation, narrative jumps, but mostly nobody speaks in anything but very heavy exposition or moralising sonnets. It's hard to read. Luckily the story itself continues to be intriguing - just don't expect to remotely care about any of the characters or motivations.